On Publishing, Mules and WW2

 

A Mountain Battery: In the Bog, by L.D. Luard
Two British soldiers attempt to haul two laden mules out of boggy ground. Behind them other mules and soldiers are visible moving up a slope in mountainous terrain. Copyright: © IWM. Original Source: http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/17034

This week, the ongoing saga of the publishing proposal took a new and interesting turn. Feeling that my project as it stands would be too “narrow”, my (hopefully) publisher have suggested that I might like to expand it to cover The Boer War, The Great War AND The Second World War. My first reaction was one of, I have to confess, utter horror. However, after a brief foray into the archives and a preliminary snoop about, the idea of delving into the soldier-horse relationship post-1939 really appeals. Already, interesting material is revealing itself. Not least, some very interesting interviews with veterans, who all talk about the respectful approach to their mules that soldiers quickly came to find worked the best. I have never met a mule, but I imagine they prefer to be ‘asked’ rather than ‘told’. Who was ‘the boss’ in this relationship is debatable, but I would be inclined to suggest that it was the soldiers who worked with the mules and that it was the mules who, in fact, did most of the training. So, the next task is to review (again), revise (yet again) and resubmit (third time lucky?) my proposal and hope that this time it gets the go-ahead. Fingers crossed!

Author: janeflynnsenseandsentimentality

I am an independent researcher and writer affiliated to The University of Derby, UK. I was awarded a PhD in 2016 for my thesis: 'Sense and Sentimentality: The Soldier-Horse Relationship in the Great War'.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s